BECAUSE CHILDREN ARE OUR MOST VALUABLE RESOURCES
And you want to educate them how to keep themselves safe.

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2/3 of teachers

do not receive specific training in preventing, recognizing or responding to child sexual abuse in either their college coursework or as part of their professional development.

24% of school personnel

have never received any oral or written guidelines on the mandated reporting requirements of their state.

A history of child sexual abuse significantly increases

dropping out of school.

We know that educating has become different, and there are always new mandates and testing requirements but without funding or materials. We are here to help with resources and materials.

Hotline Contact Information

Child Abuse Childhelp®

Phone: 800.4.A.CHILD (800.422.4453)
People They Help: Child abuse victims, parents, concerned individuals

Child Sexual Abuse Darkness to Light

Phone: 866.FOR.LIGHT (866.367.5444)
People They Help: Children and adults needing local information or resources about sexual abuse

Family Violence National Domestic Violence Hotline

Phone: 800.799.SAFE (800.799.7233)
TTY: 800.787.3224
Video Phone Only for Deaf Callers: 206.518.9361
People They Help: Children, parents, friends, offenders

Help for Parents National Parent Helpline®

Phone: 855.4APARENT (855.427.2736) (available 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., PST, weekdays)
People They Help: Parents and caregivers needing emotional support and links to resources

Human Trafficking National Human Trafficking Hotline

Phone: 888.373.7888
People They Help: Victims of human trafficking and those reporting potential trafficking situations

Mental Illness National Alliance on Mental Illness

Phone: 800.950.NAMI (800.950.6264) (available 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., ET, weekdays)
People They Help: Individuals, families, professionals

Kidsafe Books

Preview My Body is Special and Belongs to Me, click here.

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#ASKKIDSAFE

Q. How much detail should my child know about sex at age 5?

A. First I will answer your question with a question. What do you mean by ‘sex’? There is a lot more to ‘sex’ then the act itself. If your child shows interest in knowing about ‘sex’, you should ask a few questions to clarify what they are really asking about. It could be anything from understanding the differences between male and female body parts, how babies are made, puberty, family relationships. Keep the explanations age appropriate, short, simple, and use proper terminology.

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